Household energy costs leap 55 per cent

Household spending on energy has jumped by as much as 55 per cent over the course of a decade, according to new data published by the Office for National Statistics. The poorest fifth of households in the UK spent 11 per cent of their income on household energy in 2012, up from just 8 per cent in 2002.

Key points

  • Households spent an average of £106 a month on energy in 2012. This was a 55 per cent rise on the 2002 monthly spend, after accounting for inflation. This is despite a decline in average energy usage.
  • On average, households spent the equivalent of 5.1 per cent of their income on energy in 2012, up from 3.3 per cent in 2002. Most of this rise occurred between 2004 and 2009.
  • The poorest fifth of households spent 11 per cent of their income on energy in 2012, up from 8 per cent in 2002. The richest fifth spent just 3 per cent in 2012, up from 2 per cent in 2002.
  • Retired households consistently spent a greater percentage of their income on household fuel than non-retired households, even after accounting for winter fuel payments.

SourceHousehold Energy Spending in the UK, 2002-2012, Office for National Statistics
LinksReport | Daily Mail report | Telegraph report

Subjects:

Category:

Publication date: 
Mar 3 2014